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MAPS TO DOCKSIDE

 

2 Hour Morning Cruise (Blue)

1
Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts and Bobby Orr Hall of Fame
Completed in 2003, this state of the art performing arts facility hosts live performances by renowned Canadian and international musicians. The building is also home to the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame, an interactive celebration of this outstanding hockey player’s career both locally and in the NHL.
2
Canadian Coast Guard Base
The Canadian Coast Guard Base in Parry Sound is one of the largest on the Great Lakes and its primary duty is to maintain safety on the lakes through ice breaking, search and rescue and the maintenance of thousands of aids to navigation such as light- houses and beacons. The base is home to small day boats, helicopters and icebreakers.
3
Salt Dock
Nearly 100,000 tons of salt is shipped to this dock each spring from Goderich and Windsor. The salt is then used in the winter to clear ice and snow off of Ontario’s northern highways.

4
The Big Sound
This body of water is called the Big Sound and is a popular spot for sailors and water enthusiasts for its persistent west wind. It is also one of the deepest areas of Georgian Bay and the Great Lakes, reaching depths of 350 feet.
5
Village of Nobel
The Village of Nobel was named after Alfred Nobel, who invented dynamite in 1866, and was built by two companies in the early 1900’s, Canadian Industries Limited and Defence Industries Limited. Both companies built plants on the land to supply Canada’s mining industry in the north with explosives. During WWI and WWII, these plants became leading suppliers of military explosives for Canadian and Allied forces. In the 1950’s, these plants were sold to Orenda Engines, a division of Avro Canada, the manufacturer of Canada’s famous Avro Arrow, a supersonic fighter jet.
6
Huckleberry Park
Huckleberry Park is one of 14 docking and picnic sights on Georgian Bay that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources maintains for the daily or overnight use of boaters. All of the well-used sights are equipped with a large dock, fire grills, washrooms and tent sights.

7
Summer Retreats
The homes and cottages that dot the Georgian Bay shoreline here are magnificent. Many are used year-round while others, particularly those on the islands, are used only as grand summer retreats. Nowadays, most of these island retreats have electricity and running water. The value of many of these homes and cottages continues to rise, often into the millions, as a result of a government freeze on the sale of Crown land on Georgian Bay.
8
Loon Bay
The Inner Islands of Georgian Bay are home to a wide variety of Canadian wildlife. In the summer moose, black bears, raccoons, porcupines, fox, Massasauga rattlesnakes and beaver roam the shoreline while in the winter months white tailed dear and wolves migrate into the area from the north in search of food. Canada geese, blue herons and loons can also be spotted along the shoreline during the summer months and loons in particular prefer enclosed inlets like Loon Bay to do their fishing.
9
30,000 Islands
The unique granite-scraped geography and geology of Georgian Bay’s 30,000 Islands create hundreds of distinct habitat types which support a variety of rare species of plants, mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.

10
Hole in the Wall
This beautiful channel is a favourite with passengers. Just wide enough for the Island Queen to fit through, the channel is famous for its 80-foot granite cliffs that you can almost reach out and touch! On the one side, Huckleberry Island is well known for its abundance of wild blueberries and huckleberries. On the other side, Wall Island is said to have been a burial ground for the historic Ojibway Native villages in the area.

3 Hour Afternoon Cruise #1 (Orange)

1
Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts and Bobby Orr Hall of Fame
Completed in 2003, this state of the art performing arts facility hosts live performances by renowned Canadian and international musicians. The building is also home to the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame, an interactive celebration of this outstanding hockey player’s career both locally and in the NHL.
2
Canadian Coast Guard Base
The Canadian Coast Guard Base in Parry Sound is one of the largest on the Great Lakes and its primary duty is to maintain safety on the lakes through ice breaking, search and rescue and the maintenance of thousands of aids to navigation such as light- houses and beacons. The base is home to small day boats, helicopters and icebreakers.
3
Salt Dock
Nearly 100,000 tons of salt is shipped to this dock each spring from Goderich and Windsor. The salt is then used in the winter to clear ice and snow off of Ontario’s northern highways.

4
The Big Sound
This body of water is called the Big Sound and is a popular spot for sailors and water enthusiasts for its persistent west wind. It is also one of the deepest areas of Georgian Bay and the Great Lakes, reaching depths of 350 feet.
5
Village of Nobel
The Village of Nobel was named after Alfred Nobel, who invented dynamite in 1866, and was built by two companies in the early 1900’s, Canadian Industries Limited and Defence Industries Limited. Both companies built plants on the land to supply Canada’s mining industry in the north with explosives. During WWI and WWII, these plants became leading suppliers of military explosives for Canadian and Allied forces. In the 1950’s, these plants were sold to Orenda Engines, a division of Avro Canada, the manufacturer of Canada’s famous Avro Arrow, a supersonic fighter jet.
6
Huckleberry Park
Huckleberry Park is one of 14 docking and picnic sights on Georgian Bay that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources maintains for the daily or overnight use of boaters. All of the well-used sights are equipped with a large dock, fire grills, washrooms and tent sights.

7
Summer Retreats
The homes and cottages that dot the Georgian Bay shoreline here are magnificent. Many are used year-round while others, particularly those on the islands, are used only as grand summer retreats. Nowadays, most of these island retreats have electricity and running water. The value of many of these homes and cottages continues to rise, often into the millions, as a result of a government freeze on the sale of Crown land on Georgian Bay.
8
Loon Bay
The Inner Islands of Georgian Bay are home to a wide variety of Canadian wildlife. In the summer moose, black bears, raccoons, porcupines, fox, Massasauga rattlesnakes and beaver roam the shoreline while in the winter months white tailed dear and wolves migrate into the area from the north in search of food. Canada geese, blue herons and loons can also be spotted along the shoreline during the summer months and loons in particular prefer enclosed inlets like Loon Bay to do their fishing.
9
Mowat Island
The western point of Mowat Island was once home to Pratt’s Dance Pavillion. In the 1890’s and early 1900’s, Captain Pratt would transport people from the Parry Sound area to his property on Mowat Island for evening dances at the Pavillion.

10
Killbear Provincial Park
One of Ontario’s most popular summer parks, Killbear is home to miles of beautiful sandy beaches, huge granite cliffs and lots of rattlesnakes! As we cruise by the park, water enthusiasts often surround the ship with sailboats, windsurfers, and just about anything else that floats.
11
Kilcoursie Bay
Kilcoursie Bay is a popular sheltered anchorage for yachts and sailboats meandering through the 30,000 Islands. The sheltered bay was named after Viscount Kilcoursie of the Grenadier Guards who was an aid to Lord Stanley, the Governor General of Canada from 1888 to 1893. Viscount Kilcoursie was a General during WW1 leading troops at Ypres, the Somme and Passchendaele.
12
Depot Harbour
Depot Harbour is located on the far shore to the south of the ship and is one of Ontario’s most intriguing Ghost Towns. Built in the 1890’s, activity in the bustling rail town dried up in the Depression years and during World War II. Grain elevators and other buildings were turned into storage facilities for explosives, which ignited at the end of the war – burning the entire town to the ground. Little remains and the only activity in the harbour is fish farming.

13
Hole in the Wall
This beautiful channel is a favourite with passengers. Just wide enough for the Island Queen to fit through, the channel is famous for its 80-foot granite cliffs that you can almost reach out and touch! On the one side, Huckleberry Island is well known for its abundance of wild blueberries and huckleberries. On the other side, Wall Island is said to have been a burial ground for the historic Ojibway Native villages in the area.

3 Hour Afternoon Cruise #2 (Green)

1
Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts and Bobby Orr Hall of Fame
Completed in 2003, this state of the art performing arts facility hosts live performances by renowned Canadian and international musicians. The building is also home to the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame, an interactive celebration of this outstanding hockey player’s career both locally and in the NHL.
2
Canadian Coast Guard Base
The Canadian Coast Guard Base in Parry Sound is one of the largest on the Great Lakes and its primary duty is to maintain safety on the lakes through ice breaking, search and rescue and the maintenance of thousands of aids to navigation such as light- houses and beacons. The base is home to small day boats, helicopters and icebreakers.
3
Salt Dock
Nearly 100,000 tons of salt is shipped to this dock each spring from Goderich and Windsor. The salt is then used in the winter to clear ice and snow off of Ontario’s northern highways.

4
The Big Sound
This body of water is called the Big Sound and is a popular spot for sailors and water enthusiasts for its persistent west wind. It is also one of the deepest areas of Georgian Bay and the Great Lakes, reaching depths of 350 feet.
5
Hole in the Wall
This beautiful channel is a favourite with passengers. Just wide enough for the Island Queen to fit through, the channel is famous for its 80-foot granite cliffs that you can almost reach out and touch! On the one side, Huckleberry Island is well known for its abundance of wild blueberries and huckleberries. On the other side, Wall Island is said to have been a burial ground for the historic Ojibway Native villages in the area.
6
Depot Harbour
Depot Harbour is located on the far shore to the south of the ship and is one of Ontario’s most intriguing Ghost Towns. Built in the 1890’s, activity in the bustling rail town dried up in the Depression years and during World War II. Grain elevators and other buildings were turned into storage facilities for explosives, which ignited at the end of the war – burning the entire town to the ground. Little remains and the only activity in the harbour is fish farming.

7
Killbear Provincial Park
One of Ontario’s most popular summer parks, Killbear is home to miles of beautiful sandy beaches, huge granite cliffs and lots of rattlesnakes! As we cruise by the park, water enthusiasts often surround the ship with sailboats, windsurfers, and just about anything else that floats.
8
Palestine Island
Irving Berlin, the famous music composer of White Christmas and other well-known classics spent many summers vacationing on this island.
9
Waubuno Channel
This channel is named after an 1867 steam-powered side-wheeler named the Waubuno, which mysteriously sank here during a blinding snowstorm in 1879. While the hull of the ship was later located, the 24 people travelling from Collingwood to Parry Sound were never found.

10
Outer Islands
The Outer Islands of Georgian Bay’s Thirty Thousand Island region are remote, wild and absolutely spectacular. Not far from here is a plaque commemorating the 1615 passage through these islands of Samuel de Champlain, an early explorer and Governor of New France.
11
Bear’s Head
Bear’s Head is the southern most point of Parry Island, the location of the Wausauksing Ojibway Native Reserve. The point is called Bear’s Head because of the unusual number of black bears that are spotted here each summer.
12
Devil’s Elbow
Devil’s Elbow is an extremely tight right-angle turn that the Captains must navigate.

13
Seven-Mile Narrows
This narrow channel was blasted out years ago to let larger vessels pass through and is a very difficult channel to navigate through. It is a great channel to view cedars, white pines, moss and other forms of vegetation that grow among the islands.
14
Five-Mile Narrows Osprey Nest
The Osprey nest in Five-Mile Narrows is one of the only visible Osprey nests in the area and is occupied every spring and summer by Osprey returning north to breed. Young Osprey usually hatch in June.
15
Rose Point Swing Bridge
Built in the late 1800’s to connect the mainland with Depot Harbour on Parry Island, this bridge still swings open to let larger vessels like the Island Queen through.

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